Fentanyl

Many are unfamiliar with Fentanyl, so I wanted to give you a little insight concerning this particular drug. This information will enlighten you in ways you had no knowledge of. Please read and continue to pray for loved ones and others you might be addicted to Fentanyl or any other drug.

Fentanyl is a narcotic that is commonly used for pain. Fentanyl is also a controlled substance that may be a high risk for addiction and dependence. Fentanyl can cause respiratory distress and death when taken in high doses or when combined with other substances, but especially alcohol.

Fentanyl should only be prescribed by doctors who are experienced in treating pain in cancer patients. It should be used only to treat breakthrough cancer pain (sudden episodes of pain that occur despite around-the-clock treatment with pain medication) in cancer patients at least 18 years of age (or at least 16 years of age if taking Actiq brand lozenges) who are taking regularly scheduled doses of another narcotic (opiate) pain medication, and who are tolerant (used to the effects of the medication) to narcotic pain medications.

This medication should not be used to treat pain other than chronic cancer pain, especially short-term pain such as migraines or other headaches, pain from an injury, or pain after a medical or dental procedure. Fentanyl may cause serious breathing problems or death if it is used by people who are not being treated with other narcotic medications or who are not tolerant to narcotic medications.

Fentanyl may cause serious harm or death if used accidentally by a child or by an adult who has not been prescribed the medication. Even partially used fentanyl may contain enough medication to cause serious harm or death to children or other adults. Keep fentanyl out of reach of children, and if you are using the lozenges, ask your doctor how to obtain a kit from the manufacturer containing child safety locks and other supplies to prevent children from getting the medication.

Dispose of partially used lozenges according to the manufacturer’s directions immediately after you remove them from your mouth. If fentanyl is used by a child or an adult who has not been prescribed the medication, try to remove the medication from the person’s mouth and get emergency medical help.

Fentanyl should be used along with your other pain medication(s). Do not stop taking your other pain medication(s) when you begin your treatment with fentanyl. If you stop taking your other pain medication(s) you will need to stop using fentanyl.

If you still have pain after using one lozenge or tablet, your doctor may tell you to use a second lozenge or tablet. You may use the second lozenge (Actiq) 15 minutes after you finish the first lozenge, or use the second tablet (Abstral, Fentora) 30 minutes after you started using the first tablet. Do not use a second lozenge or tablet to treat the same episode of pain unless your doctor instructs you that you should.

Double Dosing: You are using fentanyl film (Onsolis), you should not use a second dose to treat the same episode of pain. After you treat an episode of pain using 1 or 2 doses of fentanyl as directed, you must wait at least 2 hours after using fentanyl (Abstral or Onsolis) or 4 hours after using fentanyl (Actiq or Fentora) before treating another episode of breakthrough cancer pain.

Know that taking certain medications with fentanyl may increase the risk that you will develop serious or life-threatening breathing problems, sedation, or coma. Tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medications: amiodarone (Nexterone, Pacerone); certain antibiotics such as clarithromycin (Biaxin, in PrevPac), erythromycin (Erythocin), telithromycin (Ketek), and troleandomycin (TAO) (not available in the US); certain antifungals such as fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Onmel, Sporanox), and ketoconazole (Nizoral); aprepitant (Emend); benzodiazepines such as alprazolam (Xanax), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), clonazepam (Klonopin), diazepam (Diastat, Valium), estazolam, flurazepam, lorazepam (Ativan), oxazepam, temazepam (Restoril), and triazolam (Halcion); cimetidine (Tagamet); diltiazem (Cardizem, Taztia, Tiazac, others); certain medications for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) such as amprenavir (Agenerase), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), ritonavir (Norvir, in Kaletra), and saquinavir (Invirase); medications for mental illness and nausea; muscle relaxants; nefazodone; sedatives; sleeping pills; tranquilizers; or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Verelan).

Your doctor may need to change the dosages of your medications and will monitor you carefully. If you use fentanyl with any of these medications and you develop any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical care: unusual dizziness, lightheadedness, extreme sleepiness, slowed or difficult breathing, or unresponsiveness. Be sure that your caregiver or family members know which symptoms may be serious so they can call the doctor or emergency medical care if you are unable to seek treatment on your own.

Fentanyl comes as four different transmucosal products and several other types of products. The medication in each product is absorbed differently by the body, so one product cannot be substituted for any other fentanyl product. If you are switching from one product to another, your doctor will prescribe a dose that is best for you.

A program has been set up for each fentanyl product to decrease the risk of using the medication. Your doctor will need to enroll in the program in order to prescribe fentanyl and you will need to have your prescription filled at a pharmacy that is enrolled in the program. As part of the program, your doctor will talk with you about the risks and benefits of using fentanyl and about how to safely use, store, and dispose of the medication.

After you talking with your doctor, you will sign a form acknowledging that you understand the risks of using fentanyl and that you will follow your doctor’s instructions to use the medication safely. Your doctor will give you more information about the program and how to get your medication and will answer any questions you have about the program and your treatment with fentanyl.

Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer’s patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with fentanyl and each time you get more medication. Please read carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if there are any questions. You can also visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website listed below (http://www.fda.gov/drugs/drugsafety/ucm085729.htm) or the manufacturer’s website to obtain the Medication Guide.

Talk to your doctor about the many risks of using this Fentanyl.

I personally know someone who was addicted and passed from this drug. It is a horrible thing to be addicted to drugs; No! I don’t know through my own personal experience but through a friend/loved one. When someone dies from an overdose and there was nothing you could do. Along with the many questions that flood your thoughts daily for a long period of time, it is overwhelming to say the least.

The main question you want to know is why? A question that cannot be answered. But with leaning and trusting in God to get you through, it is the only way you will overcome this battle in your life. You may not always get the answer, but God gives you comfort and helps guide you throughout your day. One day becomes a year, and before you know it, all things are somewhat easier to cope with.

It is God, and only God! My Comfort, my Fortress, my Help, my Rock, my Strength, my Shield, my Friend. I call Him Jesus!

Advertisements

I would love to hear from you

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.